Welcome to ProvidersWeb! 30,484 members have joined us! 
Service Standards

Search Forms, Policies & Procedures What's This?



Subscribe and Access All
4,444 Documents

(approx. 1/3 are free)

Compliance Help
Activity Manual
Admissions
Business Essentials
Care Services
Dietary Services
Emergency Services
Forms
Household Maintenance
Medication Manual
Rights, Culture & Beliefs
Staff Management
QARM
Administrator's Monthly Plans
Owner's Monthly Plans
Risk Management
We Get Letters

"I have been involved in Assisted Living and Skilled Nursing Facility Administration for over 30 years. I LOVE your website- the info is easy to use, and comprehensive. I typically write all of my own policies, procedures, forms etc. but since finding and joining Providers Web...I have so much more time to Direct our Operations....We have 7 licensed Homes for the Aged, Assisted Living Homes in the state of Michigan - a total of +/- 700 older persons, many with diagnoses of dementia. Just wanted to say thank you for making this information available, at such a reasonable cost!"

Kathleen Garfield Sharkey
Director of Operations
Heritage Senior Communities

Resources
Care Giver's Ethics
Parent Care
Care Facility Dictionary
Providers Showcase
FAQs
State Pages
Company Info
Expert Witness
 
Can't find what you need? Let us know. Contact us.

Basic Standards of Protective Supervision
by Diane Morrow, LNHA

WalkerThere is not a good definition on the internet for the current health care industry’s use of the term “protective supervision.” However, every licensed “care” facility provides some degree of “protective supervision”.

“Protective Supervision” in the “care” industry means observing people with various levels of care and supervision needs and intervening where necessary so they don’t hurt themselves.

Vulnerable children, mentally or physically impaired adults and seniors can all have a need for some degree of protective supervision. In the care industry, protective supervision means preventing a resident injuring his or her self or things like reducing the risk or preventing:

  • a resident from falling;
  • from wandering away;
  • from ingesting something harmful;
  • from walking into traffic, or turning on a stove etc...

If a care facility fails to protect a resident, under both state and federal health care & social service laws the licensing agency can issue a citation for “failure to protect from harm” or ‘failure to provide a safe environment.” Under the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA), the DOJ has the authority to seek a remedy for a pattern or practice of conduct that violates the constitutional or federal rights of residents who live in institutions. Read more

PW LogoFree Samples - For Existing Businesses

We hope you join us. Our goal is to help you be successful.

~The ProvidersWeb Service Team

Post Fall Management Plan

Retention Rates - Keeping Your Residents
Article regarding the retention of resident's, with information on how you can keep your resident's longer.

16 Ideas on Lowering Your Worker's Compensation Rates
Article with 16 ideas for lowering your worker's compensation premiums.

Allergy Season Checklist
Article about the causes of allergies and precautions you can take to avoid them.

Colds and Flu - What Do You Do?
Tis the season to be cautious. The Center of Disease Control reports over 36,000 people die of the flu each year. Colds and flu can take lives. Persons with weak immune systems are more susceptible. Antibiotics are not effective in treating virus type illnesses. If a person with a cold or flu gets a secondary bacterial infection, antibiotics can be used to treat that.
 
Facility Manager Program Audit
Areas for the Facility Manager of a care facility to review and audit for Quality Assurance and Risk Management (QA-RM).

Owner's Review - Quick List
This quick list is to assist the owner or director do a quick review on critical liability areas.

Care Homes Going Green
Article about helping the environment.

Loving Leadership
Learn to lead others by a loving example.
 
Cold and Flu Care Check Off List
Free Check Off List to make sure your care facility is doing everything possible to take good care of your resident's during a cold and flu illness, and to prevent the spread of illness.

Dementia Care Program Check Off A check off list to insure that your facility is completing and/or using the Dementia Care Program correctly.

Bedridden Risks
The risks of retaining a bedridden resident.

Generator Tips and Safety
Safety tips for the use of a generator in a care facility.

Medication Master List
A list of medication terminology and the description used in a Care Facility, such as: discontinued medications, medication errors, PRN medications, etc.

Memorial Services
Sometimes it is important for the resident's family, staff, and friends to hold a Memorial Service at the Care Facility.

Food Service Audit
Form used to audit the dietary department of a care facility.

White House Least Restrictive
An executive order signed by President George W. Bush from the White House regarding community-based alternatives for individuals with disabilities.

Medication Legalites

The National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention defines a medication error as "any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm while the medication is in the control of the health care professional, patient, or consumer. Such events may be related to professional practice, health care products, procedures, and systems, including prescribing, order communication, product labeling, packaging, nomenclature, compounding, dispensing, distribution, administration, education, monitoring, and use."

Common problems in community care facilities and assisted living facilities that are managing medications include but are not limited to:

  • Heart and handsMedications given to the wrong person
  • Wrong amount of medication given
  • Medication given the wrong way
  • Medication refused
  • Medication missed
  • The resident not self-storing in accordance with the law
  • Medication stolen
  • Improper documentation of Medication taken
  • Medication not being destroyed properly
  • Medication not available

Read More

Basic Standards of Protective Supervision

WalkerThere is not a good definition on the internet for the current health care industry’s use of the term “protective supervision.” However, every licensed “care” facility provides some degree of “protective supervision”.

“Protective Supervision” in the “care” industry means observing people with various levels of care and supervision needs and intervening where necessary so they don’t hurt themselves.

Vulnerable children, mentally or physically impaired adults and seniors can all have a need for some degree of protective supervision. In the care industry, protective supervision means preventing a resident injuring his or her self or things like reducing the risk or preventing:

  • a resident from falling;
  • from wandering away;
  • from ingesting something harmful;
  • from walking into traffic, or turning on a stove etc..

If a care facility fails to protect a resident, under both state and federal health care & social service laws the licensing agency can issue a citation for “failure to protect from harm” or ‘failure to provide a safe environment.” Under the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA), the DOJ has the authority to seek a remedy for a pattern or practice of conduct that violates the constitutional or federal rights of residents who live in institutions.

Basic Levels of “Protective Supervision”

I have created the following levels of “protective supervision” to help better define the standard of care usually provided. Due to changing health conditions at anytime a resident’s condition can change and a higher level of care may be warranted. A resident may be able to stay “in place”, and not move to a higher level of care, for under the Americans With Disabilities Act “ADA” a resident has the right to live in the least restrictive environment, if they can prove their care needs can be safely met.

In all levels listed below, the “licensee” must provide “protective supervision”. In addition, if the resident is, or becomes, physically and/or mentally incapacitated and the responsible party cannot be reached, the “licensee” usually has the “Consent for Medical Treatment” so that they may act on the resident’s behalf, and protect the resident from harm.

Also, in each of the following levels the environment is already set up with safety in mind. See ProvidersWeb’s Household Maintenance Manual for more information on safe care facility and safe home environments. A licensed care provider is not allowed to have a situation which could lead to placing the resident(s), staff, or the public in Immediate Jeopardy. “Immediate Jeopardy” means a situation in which the provider's noncompliance has caused or is likely to cause serious injury, harm, impairment, or death to a resident.

BASIC LEVELS OF “PROTECTIVE SUPERVISION”

Level One Minimal: Provided at Home or in Licensed Residential Care or Assisted Living Type Facility.

The resident is on “general observation” in a care facility that is not a locked facility. Caregiver(s) are aware of the resident’s general whereabouts. Residents are able to go out independently and they are able to call to get help if needed. Residents can typically be left unattended for several hours at a time to engage in independent activities, (typically 2-4 hours during the day & evening, with night check(s)), but they need access to a support person for guidance or assistance.

Caregivers ensure the resident is taking their medications right (if any), eating, bathing & personal hygiene supervision as well as watching out for the resident’s overall health and well-being, including assisting with access to medical and dental care. Medications are typically self-administered with supervised assistance. Care Plans are tried to reduce risks, if unsuccessful the resident is usually placed in a higher level of care.

Level Two Moderate: Provided at Home or in Licensed Residential Care, Assisted Living Facility, Intermediate Care Facility, Skilled Nursing & Medical Facilities

Secure perimeter(s) or protective type environment, but not “locked”. This is a place where safety measures are taken to prevent confused persons from leaving the facility unnoticed. i.e. residents wear alarm bands, alarms on the doors, delayed egress exits. Residents are usually consistently monitored with videos, and/or other electrical devices. Residents may be left unattended for short periods of time provided that a support person can respond quickly in an emergency situation. Read More

 
   
Contact Us | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy Copyright © 2004-2017 ProvidersWeb. Site by webdancers